LECTURE PLAN

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FACULTY OF INDUSTRIAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (FIIT)

LECTURE PLAN

IAS1233 – OPERATING SYSTEM

Learning Outcome:

After completing the subject, students will be able to:

  • Describe the role , purpose and basic concept of new type operating systems
  • Identify the Memory Manager or Memory Management to describe the functionality of memory allocation.
  • Identify the Processor Manager and Process Management in responding for allocating the processor to execute incoming jobs and differentiates job scheduling and process scheduling.
  • Identify the Device Manager or Device Management to responsible on controlling and monitoring use of devices.
  • Identify how File Manager or File Management to control and organized every file in the system.

Class Schedule:

DAY

TIME

VENUE

NOTE

Friday

Monday

Consultation Schedule:

DAY

TIME

Course Planning:

WEEK

CHAPTER

TASK

1

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO OPERATING SYSTEM

LECTURE/QUIZ 1

2

CHAPTER 2: MEMORY MANAGEMENT, EARLY MANAGEMENT AND EVOLUTION OF VIRTUAL MEMORY

LECTURE/QUIZ 2

3

CHAPTER 3: PROCESSOR MANAGEMENT

LECTURE/QUIZ 3

4

CHAPTER 4: PROCESS MANAGEMENT

LECTURE

5

MIDTERM TEST

22.8.2011

6

CHAPTER 6: DEVICE MANAGEMENT

LECTURE

7

CHAPTER 7: FILE MANAGEMENT

LECTURE

8

CHAPTER 10 SYSTEM SECURITY

CONSULTATION

9

CHAPTER 11 SYSTEM MANAGEMENT

CONSULTATION

10

UNIX/MS-DOS OPERATING SYSTEMS

LAB

11

LINUX/WINDOWS OPERATING SYSTEMS

LAB

12

PROJECT/ TUTORIAL / EXERCISE / PRESENTATION

13

REVISON CHAPTER

24-28/10/2011

(END OF CLASS)

15

FINAL EXAM

Assessment:

Assessment Type

Weight

Frequency

Quiz

10%

3

Assignment

15%

1

Lab Exercise/Project/Presentation

15%

>3

Mid Term Examination (Chapter 1-3)

20%

1

Final Exam

40%

1

Main references supporting the course

Ida M. Flynn, Ann McIver-McHoes, “Understanding Operating Systems, Sixth Edition”, Course Technology 2011.

Brian L.Stuart, “Principles of Operating Systems”, Course Technology 2009.

Additional references supporting the course

1. A. Silberschatz, P. Galvin, G. Gagne, “Operating System Concepts (Sixth Edition)”, John Wiley & Sons 2004.

2. Andrew S Tanenbaum, Albert S Woodhull, “Operating Systems Design and Implementation (3rd Edition)”, Prentice Hall 2006.

3. Harvey M. Deitel, Paul J. Deitel, David R. Choffnes, “Operating Systems (3rd Edition)”,Prentice Hall 2003.

Journal References

Reinventing Unix: an introduction to the Plan 9 operating system

Type: Technical paper

Author(s): Brian Hancock

Source: Library Hi Tech Volume: 21 Issue: 4 2003

Important Notes:

1. If you do not submit an item of coursework, or you do not attend the examination, you will receive zero mark for that component of the assessment. If you submit neither, you will receive no grade for the unit. If you are unable to attend the final exam, you should apply to the faculty for the deferred exam. The faculty has established procedures for this (further information is available from the Faculty Office). No excuse is accepted for not attending any quiz(s) or test(s) conducted during the course. Students are not allowed to re-sit or defer any quiz(s) or mid term examination.

2. Students who are absent for than 80% of the prescribed classes can be barred from final exam which will result into receiving no grade for the paper.

3. Using information from other sources and not citing the source is plagiarism, a form of CHEATING. When you are working with other students, please remember that failing to contribute adequately to the project but taking full credit for others efforts is also a form of cheating. If you are caught CHEATING or TRYING TO CHEAT in your assignment(s), quiz(s) or final exam, you can and will be punished accordingly.

4. Student attending the class must follow and adhere to the University’s dress code. Any student caught not adhering to said dress code can and will be prohibited from attending my class(s) and any loss resulted from his/her absentee regarding this matter will be his/her own liability.

5. Students at all time should maintain good manners with lectures and other university’s staff.

6. Respect lecture and other student’s times and rights. No paging, messaging (SMS) or telephoning is allowed during class.

ASSIGNMENT

Posted on 12:48 AM | By MOHD NOOR RIZAL BIN ARBAIN | In

FACULTY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY

OPERATING SYSTEM

ASSIGNMENTS (15 %)

QUESTIONS:

  1. Research the internet or current literature to identify an operating system that runs a cell phone or handheld computer. (These are generally known as mobile operating system). List the key features of the operating system and the hardware it is designed to run. Cite your source.
  1. Research the similarities and differences between Linux and UNIX. List at least five major differences between the two operating systems and cite your sources. Describe in your own words which operating system you prefer and explain why.

Note:

Do it by Group/Individual

Submit before 26 August 2011 (before Semester Breaks)

Virtual memory, low cost, of course

Posted on 7:14 PM | By MOHD NOOR RIZAL BIN ARBAIN | In

Ready boost is actually a virtual memory. You may have to use a hard disk used as virtual memory that serves to assist the work of a main memory. But this time the existence of hard disk used as virtual memory has been replaced by the flash disk. Virtual memory is very useful when the main memory is not big enough. With such capacity, then in some usage is likely that memory capacity will be quickly filled. Moreover, if the program used is a program that uses large memory capacity, such as editing photos, videos and other digital imaging.

Currently the memory a computer has the greater capacity, the average reached 1 GB or more. But unfortunately, this time some computer programs also require a memory capacity large enough, as for example the Windows 7 operating system which requires a minimum memory capacity of 1 GB. This is particularly felt if you run multiple applications at once, such as browsers, Microsoft Word, Windows Media player, and some applications are often run simultaneously.

Operating system using the hard disk capacity as additional memory, which determines the operating system files that remain stationed in the main memory and the file can be moved into the virtual memory. Files that are often run remains placed in the main memory.

History of Operating System

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First Generation (1945-1955): Vacuum Tubes and Plugboards
- No programming language nor OS
- Machine language
- The use of plugboards, punched cards
Second Generation (1955-1965): Transistor and Batch System
- Introduction of transistor
- Fortran, Assembler
- Batch system

- Offline system:


- Operating System usually used:
FMS (Fortran Monitor System)
IBSYS (OS for IBM 7094)
- Example of FMS job structure:


Third Generation (1965-1980): ICs and Multiprogramming
- IBM 360 for scientific calculation (i.e numerical) and commercial (i.e character-oriented)
- IC (Integrated Circuit)
- Introduction of multiprogramming
- Introduction of SPOOLING (Simultaneous Peripheral Operation On Line)
- Introduction of time-sharing
- Development of “computer utility” Þ machine that supports hundreds of timesharing users
Eg: MULTICS (Multiplex Information and Computing Service)
- Development of minicomputer
Eg: DEC PDP-1 until PDP-11
- Development of UNIX (Uniplexed Information and Computing Service)
Fourth Generation (1980-now): LSI and PC
- LSI (Large Scale Integration) circuit and chips consisting of thousands of transistor Þ birth of PC (Personal Computer)
- User-friendly software
- Dominant Operating System:
MS-DOS, Win ME, Win NT
Unix, X Window
- Network Operating System
- Distributed Operating System